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Dordrecht Confession of Faith

The Dordrecht Confession of Faith is a statement of religious beliefs adopted by Dutch Mennonite leaders at a meeting in Dordrecht, the Netherlands, on 21 April 1632. Its 18 articles emphasize belief in salvation through Jesus Christ, baptism, no ...

                                               

Faithful saying

The faithful sayings are sayings in the pastoral epistles of the New Testament. There are five sayings with this label, and the Greek phrase is the same in all instances, although the KJV uses a different word in 1 Timothy 3:1. George W. Knight I ...

                                               

Guanabara Confession of Faith

The Guanabara Confession of Faith was a Calvinist creed from 1558. The first Protestant writing in Brazil, and in all of the Americas, it was written by the French Huguenots Jean du Bourdel, Matthieu Verneuil, Pierre Bourdon and Andre la Fon, who ...

                                               

Jesus is Lord

Jesus is Lord is the shortest credal affirmation found in the New Testament, one of several slightly more elaborate variations. It serves as a statement of faith for the majority of Christians who regard Jesus as both fully man and God. It is the ...

                                               

Kansas City Statement of Faith

The Kansas City Statement of Faith is a 1913 confession of faith adopted by the National Council of the Congregational Churches of the United States at Kansas City, Missouri. This concise statement of Congregational beliefs restates traditional c ...

                                               

List of Christian creeds

Christianity has through Church history produced a number of Christian creeds, confessions and statements of faith. The following lists are provided. In many cases, individual churches will address further doctrinal questions in a set of bylaws. ...

                                               

Maasai Creed

The Maasai Creed is a creed composed in 1960 by the Maasai people of East Africa in collaboration with missionaries from the Congregation of the Holy Ghost. The creed attempts to express the essentials of the Christian faith within the Maasai cul ...

                                               

Moravian Confession

Moravian Confession is a doctrinal document of Protestants in Moravia from 1566. It is written in moderate and inclusivistic tone. It is based on Augsburg Confession and puts emphasis on church discipline. About two-thirds of Moravian Protestant ...

                                               

Old Roman Symbol

The Old Roman Symbol, or Old Roman Creed, is an earlier and shorter version of the Apostles’ Creed. It was based on the 2nd-century Rule of Faith and the interrogatory declaration of faith for those receiving Baptism, which by the 4th century was ...

                                               

Profession of faith (Christianity)

Various Christian Churches require people to make a personal profession of faith according to a prescribed formula, when taking up certain posts in its service or joining that Church.

                                               

Racovian Catechism

The Racovian Catechism is a nontrinitarian statement of faith from the 16th century. The title Racovian comes from the publishers, the Polish Brethren, who had founded a sizeable town in Rakow, Kielce County, where the Racovian Academy and printi ...

                                               

Remonstrant Confession

The Remonstrant Confession or literally the Confession or Declaration of the Remonstrant Pastors refers to the confession of faith of the Remonstrant brotherhood, published in 1621.

                                               

Schleitheim Confession

The Schleitheim Confession was the most representative statement of Anabaptist principles, by a group of Swiss Anabaptists in 1527 in Schleitheim.

                                               

Pillars of Adventism

The Pillars of Adventism are landmark doctrines for Seventh-day Adventists; Bible doctrines that define who they are as a people of faith; doctrines that are "non-negotiables" in Adventist theology. The Seventh-day Adventist church teaches that t ...

                                               

Strasbourg Consensus

The Strasbourg Consensus was a joint statement of doctrine by Reformed and Lutheran theologians, signed in Strasbourg in March 1563. The signing of the Strasbourg Consensus resolved the open struggles in Stasbourg, with both factions signing a jo ...

                                               

Equivalent circuit

In electrical engineering and science, an equivalent circuit refers to a theoretical circuit that retains all of the electrical characteristics of a given circuit. Often, an equivalent circuit is sought that simplifies calculation, and more broad ...

                                               

Extra element theorem

The Extra Element Theorem is an analytic technique developed by R. D. Middlebrook for simplifying the process of deriving driving point and transfer functions for linear electronic circuits. Much like Thevenins theorem, the extra element theorem ...

                                               

Fosters reactance theorem

Fosters reactance theorem is an important theorem in the fields of electrical network analysis and synthesis. The theorem states that the reactance of a passive, lossless two-terminal network always strictly monotonically increases with frequency ...

                                               

Generator (circuit theory)

A generator in electrical circuit theory is one of two ideal elements: an ideal voltage source, or an ideal current source. These are two of the fundamental elements in circuit theory. Real electrical generators are most commonly modelled as a no ...

                                               

Nortons theorem

In direct-current circuit theory, Nortons theorem is a simplification that can be applied to networks made of linear time-invariant resistances, voltage sources, and current sources. At a pair of terminals of the network, it can be replaced by a ...

                                               

Port (circuit theory)

In electrical circuit theory, a port is a pair of terminals connecting an electrical network or circuit to an external circuit, a point of entry or exit for electrical energy. A port consists of two nodes connected to an outside circuit, that mee ...

                                               

Superposition theorem

The superposition theorem for electrical circuits states that for a linear system the response in any branch of a bilateral linear circuit having more than one independent source equals the algebraic sum of the responses caused by each independen ...

                                               

Tellegens theorem

Tellegens theorem is one of the most powerful theorems in network theory. Most of the energy distribution theorems and extremum principles in network theory can be derived from it. It was published in 1952 by Bernard Tellegen. Fundamentally, Tell ...

                                               

Thevenins theorem

As originally stated in terms of DC resistive circuits only, Thevenins theorem holds that: Any linear electrical network containing only voltage sources, current sources and resistances can be replaced at terminals A-B by an equivalent combinatio ...

                                               

Birkhoffs theorem (relativity)

In general relativity, Birkhoffs theorem states that any spherically symmetric solution of the vacuum field equations must be static and asymptotically flat. This means that the exterior solution must be given by the Schwarzschild metric. The the ...

                                               

Goldberg–Sachs theorem

The Goldberg–Sachs theorem is a result in Einsteins theory of general relativity about vacuum solutions of the Einstein field equations relating the existence of a certain type of congruence with algebraic properties of the Weyl tensor. More prec ...

                                               

Levinsons theorem

Levinsons theorem is an important theorem in non-relativistic quantum scattering theory. It relates the number of bound states of a potential to the difference in phase of a scattered wave at zero and infinite energies. It was published by Norman ...

                                               

No-hiding theorem

When a quantum system interacts with the external world it undergoes decoherence and in some cases the information about the original system may be completely lost. Then it is natural to ask where does the information reside? Does it remain in th ...

                                               

Runge–Gross theorem

In quantum mechanics, specifically time-dependent density functional theory, the Runge–Gross theorem shows that for a many-body system evolving from a given initial wavefunction, there exists a one-to-one mapping between the potential in which th ...

                                               

Misyar marriage

A misyar marriage is a type of marriage contract in Wahabi sects of Islam. The husband and wife thus joined are able to renounce some marital rights such as living together, the wifes rights to housing and maintenance money, and the husbands righ ...

                                               

Frustration in English law

Frustration is an English contract law doctrine that acts as a device to set aside contracts where an unforeseen event either renders contractual obligations impossible, or radically changes the partys principal purpose for entering into the cont ...

                                               

Judicial immunity

Judicial immunity is a form of legal immunity which protects judges and others employed by the judiciary from liability resulting from their judicial actions.

                                               

Kastigar v. United States

Kastigar v. United States, 406 U.S. 441, was a United States Supreme Court decision that ruled on the issue of whether the governments grant of immunity from prosecution can compel a witness to testify over an assertion of the Fifth Amendment pri ...

                                               

Speech or Debate Clause

The Speech or Debate Clause is a clause in the United States Constitution. The clause states that members of both Houses of Congress .shall in all Cases, except Treason, Felony and Breach of the Peace, be privileged from Arrest during their atten ...

                                               

Allen v. Wright

Allen v. Wright, 468 U.S. 737, was a United States Supreme Court case that determined that citizens do not have standing to sue a federal government agency based on the influence that the agencys determinations might have on third parties.

                                               

Campbell v. Clinton

Campbell v. Clinton, 203 F.3d 19, was a case holding that members of Congress could not sue President Bill Clinton for alleged violations of the War Powers Resolution in his handling of the war in Yugoslavia.

                                               

City of Los Angeles v. Lyons

City of Los Angeles v. Lyons, 461 U.S. 95, was a United States Supreme Court decision holding that the plaintiff, Adolph Lyons, lacked standing to challenge the city police departments use of chokeholds.

                                               

DaimlerChrysler Corp. v. Cuno

DaimlerChrysler Corp. v. Cuno, 547 U.S. 332, is a United States Supreme Court case involving the standing of taxpayers to challenge state tax laws in federal court. The Court unanimously ruled that state taxpayers did not have standing under Arti ...

                                               

Diamond v. Charles

Diamond v. Charles, 476 U.S. 54, was a United States Supreme Court case that determined that citizens do not have Article III standing to challenge the constitutionality of a state statute in federal court unless they possess a "direct stake" in ...

                                               

FEC v. Akins

Federal Election Commission v. Akins, 524 U.S. 11, was a United States Supreme Court case deciding that an individual could sue for a violation of a federal law pursuant to a statute enacted by the U.S. Congress which created a general right to a ...

                                               

Flast v. Cohen

Flast v. Cohen, 392 U.S. 83, was a United States Supreme Court case holding that a taxpayer has standing to sue the government to prevent an unconstitutional use of taxpayer funds. The Supreme Court decided in Frothingham v. Mellon 1923, that a t ...

                                               

Pfizer Inc. v. Government of India

Pfizer Inc. v. Government of India, 434 U.S. 308, decision of the Supreme Court of the United States in which the Court held that foreign states are entitled to sue for treble damages in U.S. courts, and should be recognized as "persons" under th ...

                                               

Poe v. Ullman

Poe v. Ullman, 367 U.S. 497, was a United States Supreme Court case that held that plaintiffs lacked standing to challenge a Connecticut law that banned the use of contraceptives and banned doctors from advising their use because the law had neve ...

                                               

Schlesinger v. Reservists Committee to Stop the War

Schlesinger v. Reservists Committee to Stop the War, 418 U.S. 208, was a decision by the United States Supreme Court which ruled that citizens do not have the right to challenge the constitutionality of members of Congress holding reserve commiss ...

                                               

Spokeo, Inc. v. Robins

Spokeo, Inc. v. Robins, 578 U.S. ___, was a United States Supreme Court case in which the Court vacated and remanded a ruling by United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit on the basis that the Ninth Circuit had not properly determined ...

                                               

Warth v. Seldin

Warth v. Seldin, 422 U.S. 490, was a United States Supreme Court case in which the Court reviewed the concept of judicial standing and affirmed that if the plaintiffs lacked standing, they could not maintain a case against the defendants.

                                               

Christian angelology

In Christianity, angels are agents of God, based on angels in Judaism. The most influential Christian angelic hierarchy was that put forward by Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite in the 4th or 5th century in his book De Coelesti Hierarchia. During t ...

                                               

Hierarchy of angels

A hierarchy of angels is a belief or tradition found in the angelology of different religions, which holds that there are different levels or ranks of angels. Higher ranks may be asserted to have greater power or authority over lower ranks, and w ...

                                               

Archangel

An archangel is an angel of high rank. The word "archangel" itself is usually associated with the Abrahamic religions, but beings that are very similar to archangels are found in a number of religious traditions. The English word archangel is der ...

                                               

Bearers of the Throne

Bearers of the Throne or hamlat al-arsh are a group of angels in Islam. The Quran mentions them in Quran 40:7 and Quran 69:17. In Islamic traditions, they are often portrayed in zoomorphic forms. They are described as resembling different creatur ...