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ⓘ Determinants of health




                                               

Adventist Health Studies

Adventist Health Studies is a series of long-term medical research projects of Loma Linda University with the intent to measure the link between lifestyle, diet, disease and mortality of Seventh-day Adventists. Seventh-day Adventists have a lower risk than other Americans of certain diseases, and many researchers hypothesize that this is due to dietary and other lifestyle habits. This provides a special opportunity to answer scientific questions about how diet and other health habits affect the risk of suffering from many chronic diseases. Two studies on Adventist health involving 24.000 a ...

                                               

Adverse Childhood Experiences Study

The Adverse Childhood Experiences Study is a research study conducted by the U.S. health maintenance organization Kaiser Permanente and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Participants were recruited to the study between 1995 and 1997 and have since been in long-term follow up for health outcomes. The study has demonstrated an association of adverse childhood experiences with health and social problems across the lifespan. The study has produced many scientific articles and conference and workshop presentations that examine ACEs.

                                               

Blue Zone

Blue Zones are regions of the world where Dan Buettner claims people live much longer than average. The term first appeared in his November 2005 National Geographic magazine cover story, "The Secrets of a Long Life". Buettner identified five regions as "Blue Zones": Okinawa ; Sardinia ; Nicoya ; Ikaria ; and among the Seventh-day Adventists in Loma Linda, California. He offers an explanation, based on data and first hand observations, for why these populations live healthier and longer lives than others. The concept grew out of demographic work done by Gianni Pes and Michel Poulain outline ...

                                               

Cultural competence in healthcare

Cultural competence in healthcare refers to the ability for healthcare professionals to demonstrate cultural competence toward patients with diverse values, beliefs, and feelings. This process includes consideration of the individual social, cultural, and psychological needs of patients for effective cross-cultural communication with their health care providers. The goal of cultural competence in health care is to reduce health disparities and to provide optimal care to patients regardless of their race, gender, ethnic background, native languages spoken, and religious or cultural beliefs. ...

                                               

Gender disparities in health

WHO has defined health as "a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity." Identified by the 2012 World Development Report as one of two key human capital endowments, health can influence an individuals ability to reach his or her full potential in society. Yet while gender equality has made the most progress in areas such as education and labor force participation, health inequality between men and women continues to plague many societies today. While both males and females face health disparities, girls and women experience ...

                                               

Healing environments

Healing environment, for healthcare buildings describes a physical setting and organizational culture that supports patients and families through the stresses imposed by illness, hospitalization, medical visits, the process of healing, and sometimes, bereavement. The concept implies that the physical healthcare environment can make a difference in how quickly the patient recovers from or adapts to specific acute and chronic conditions.

                                               

Health and wealth

Health in Mali Social determinants of health in Mexico Health care in the United States

                                               

Health equity

Health equity arises from access to the social determinants of health, specifically from wealth, power and prestige. Individuals who have consistently been deprived of these three determinants are significantly disadvantaged from health inequities, and face worse health outcomes than those who are able to access certain resources. Equity refers to how resources are distributed, or, allocated among a given population. In addition, the term "equity" is an ethic and human rights principle. Heath inequities stem from a failure in this distribution and not providing each individual with the res ...

                                               

Health psychology

Health psychology is the study of psychological and behavioral processes in health, illness, and healthcare. It is concerned with understanding how psychological, behavioral, and cultural factors contribute to physical health and illness. Psychological factors can affect health directly. For example, chronically occurring environmental stressors affecting the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, cumulatively, can harm health. Behavioral factors can also affect a persons health. For example, certain behaviors can, over time, harm or enhance health. Health psychologists take a biopsychosocia ...

                                               

Healthy building

Healthy building refers to an emerging area of interest that supports the physical, psychological, and social health and well-being of people in buildings and the built environment. Buildings can be key promoters of health and well-being since most people spend a majority of their time indoors. According to the National Human Activity Pattern Survey, Americans spend" an average of 87% of their time in enclosed buildings and about 6% of their time in enclosed vehicles.” Healthy building can be seen as the next generation of Green building that not only includes environmentally responsible a ...

                                               

Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions

The Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions, a research center within the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, strives to eradicate disparities in health and health care among racial and ethnic groups, socioeconomic groups, and geopolitical categories such as urban, rural, and suburban populations. The HCHDS works collaboratively with community-based organizations, historically black colleges, and minority serving institutions to advance knowledge on the causes of health and health care disparities and develop interventions to eliminate them. Specifically, the HCHDS has ...

                                               

Inverse care law

The inverse care law is the principle that the availability of good medical or social care tends to vary inversely with the need of the population served. Proposed by Julian Tudor Hart in 1971, the term has since been widely adopted. It is a pun on inverse-square law, a term and concept from physics. The law states that: "The availability of good medical care tends to vary inversely with the need for it in the population served. This. operates more completely where medical care is most exposed to market forces, and less so where such exposure is reduced." Hart later paraphrased his argumen ...

                                               

Marriage and health

Marriage and health are closely related. Married people experience lower morbidity and mortality across such diverse health threats as cancer, heart attacks, and surgery. There are gender differences in these effects which may be partially due to mens and womens relative status. Most research on marriage and health has focused on heterosexual couples, and more work is needed to clarify the health effects on same-sex marriage. Simply being married, as well as the quality of ones marriage, has been linked to diverse measures of health. Research has examined the social-cognitive, emotional, b ...

                                               

Overcrowding

Overcrowding or crowding refers to the condition where more people are located within a given space than is considered tolerable from a safety and health perspective which will depend on current environment and local cultural norms. Overcrowding may arise temporarily and/or regularly, in the home, public spaces or on public transport. The former is of particular concern since it is an individuals place of shelter. Effects on quality of life due to crowding may be due to increased physical contact, lack of sleep, lack of privacy and poor hygiene practices. While population density is an obj ...

                                               

Occupational health psychology

Occupational health psychology is an interdisciplinary area of psychology that is concerned with the health and safety of workers. OHP addresses a number of major topic areas including the impact of occupational stressors on physical and mental health, the impact of involuntary unemployment on physical and mental health, work-family balance, workplace violence and other forms of mistreatment, accidents and safety, and interventions designed to improve/protect worker health. Although OHP emerged from two distinct disciplines within applied psychology, namely, health psychology and industria ...

                                               

Rural health

In medicine, rural health or rural medicine is the interdisciplinary study of health and health care delivery in rural environments. The concept of rural health incorporates many fields, including geography, midwifery, nursing, sociology, economics, and telehealth or telemedicine. Research shows that the healthcare needs of individuals living in rural areas are different from those in urban areas, and rural areas often suffer from a lack of access to healthcare. These differences are the result of geographic, demographic, socioeconomic, workplace, and personal health factors. For example, ...

                                               

Social determinants of health

The social determinants of health are the economic and social conditions that influence individual and group differences in health status. They are the health promoting factors found in ones living and working conditions, rather than individual risk factors that influence the risk for a disease, or vulnerability to disease or injury. The distributions of social determinants are often shaped by public policies that reflect prevailing political ideologies of the area. The World Health Organization says, "This unequal distribution of health-damaging experiences is not in any sense a natural p ...

                                               

Social determinants of health in Mexico

Social determinants of health in Mexico are factors that influence the status of health among certain populations in Mexico. These factors consist of circumstances in which people grow, live, work, and age, as well as the systems put in place to deal with illnesses. In Mexico, the health inequality among the population is influenced by such social factors. In the past decade, Mexico has witnessed immense progress within their health care system that has allowed for greater access to health care and a decrease in mortality rate, yet there are still various health inequalities caused by soci ...

                                               

Social determinants of health in poverty

The social determinants of health in poverty describe the factors that affect impoverished populations health and health inequality. Inequalities in health stem from the conditions of peoples lives, including living conditions, work environment, age, and other social factors, and how these affect peoples ability to respond to illness. These conditions are also shaped by political, social, and economic structures. The majority of people around the globe do not meet their potential best health because of a "toxic combination of bad policies, economics, and politics". Daily living conditions ...

                                               

Social medicine

The field of social medicine seeks to implement social care through understanding how social and economic conditions impact health, disease and the practice of medicine and fostering conditions in which this understanding can lead to a healthier society. Social medicine as a scientific field gradually began in the early 19th century, the Industrial Revolution and the subsequent increase in poverty and disease among workers raised concerns about the effect of social processes on the health of the poor. The field of social medicine is most commonly addressed today by public health efforts to ...

                                               

Social predictors of depression

Social predictors of depression are aspects of ones social environment that are related to an individual developing major depression. These risk factors include negative social life events, conflict, and low levels of social support, all of which have been found affect the likelihood of someone experiencing major depression, the length of the depression, or the severity of the symptoms.

                                               

Unnatural Causes: Is Inequality Making Us Sick?

Unnatural Causes: Is Inequality Making Us Sick? is a four-hour documentary series, broadcast nationally on PBS in spring 2008, that examines the role of social determinants of health in creating health inequalities/health disparities in the United States. Based on extensive research by a wide variety of academics, public health experts, and medical practitioners, the seven-part series explores how class and racism can have greater impacts on ones health outcomes than genetics or personal behavior. The opening 56-minute episode, In Sickness and In Wealth, presents the series’ overarching th ...

                                     

ⓘ Determinants of health

  • Globalization and health for example, illustrates the complex and changing sociological environment within which the determinants of health and disease express
  • economic and environmental determinants of health such as housing, crime and employment behavioural determinants of health such as smoking, drinking
  • social determinants of health Health in All Policies and social protection, he is the Director of Health Systems and Innovation at the Office of the Assistant
  • affect the determinants of health HiAP is an approach to policy making in which decision - makers in other sectors routinely consider health outcomes, including
  • and teaching and who understand determinants of community health and how to build the capacity of communities, health - related agencies and academic centers
  • within and between countries. The WHO s Committee on the Social Determinants of Health stated that the social gradient, - systematic differences between
  • preventative health but also on non - medical determinants of health eg housing, food security, and transportation and behavioral health integration is
  • oral health promotion: There are three important way in achieving oral health promotion, which is done by addressing the determinants of oral health community

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