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ⓘ Mythological food and drink




                                               

Ambrosia

In the ancient Greek myths, ambrosia is the food or drink of the Greek gods, often depicted as conferring longevity or immortality upon whomever consumed it. It was brought to the gods in Olympus by doves and served by either Hebe or Ganymede at the heavenly feast. Ambrosia is sometimes depicted in ancient art as distributed by a nymph labeled with that name and a nurse of Dionysus. In the myth of Lycurgus, the king attacked Ambrosia and Dionysus entourage, causing the god to drive Lycurgus insane.

                                               

Amrita

Amrita, Amrit or Amata is a word that literally means "immortality" and is often referred to in ancient Indian texts as nectar. "Amrta" is etymologically related to the Greek ambrosia and carries the same meaning. Its first occurrence is in the Rigveda, where it is considered one of several synonyms for soma, the drink of the devas. Amrit has varying significance in different Indian religions. The word Amrit is also a common first name for Sikhs and Hindus, while its feminine form is Amritā.

                                               

Forbidden fruit

In Abrahamic religions, forbidden fruit is a name given to the fruit growing in the Garden of Eden which God commands mankind not to eat. In the biblical narrative, Adam and Eve eat the fruit from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil and are exiled from Eden. And the Lord God commanded the man, saying, Of every tree of the garden thou mayest freely eat: But of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not eat of it: for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die. As a metaphor, the phrase typically refers to any indulgence or pleasure that is considered il ...

                                               

Golden apple

The golden apple is an element that appears in various national and ethnic folk legends or fairy tales. Recurring themes depict a hero retrieving the golden apples hidden or stolen by a monstrous antagonist. Alternatively, as part of the mysterious apple branch of Otherworld in Irish mythology.

                                               

Manna

Manna, sometimes or archaically spelled mana is, according to the Bible, an edible substance which God provided for the Israelites during their travels in the desert during the 40-year period following the Exodus and prior to the conquest of Canaan. It is also mentioned in the Quran three times.

                                               

Mead of poetry

In Norse mythology, the Poetic Mead or Mead of Poetry, also known as Mead of Suttungr, is a mythical beverage that whoever "drinks becomes a skald or scholar" to recite any information and solve any question. This myth was reported by Snorri Sturluson in Skaldskaparmal. The drink is a vivid metaphor for poetic inspiration, often associated with Odin the god of possession via berserker rage or poetic inspiration.

                                               

Peaches of Immortality

In Chinese mythology, Peaches of Immortality are consumed by the immortals due to their mystic virtue of conferring longevity on all who eat them. Peaches symbolizing immortality are a common symbol in Chinese art, appearing in depictions or descriptions in a number of fables, paintings, and other forms of art, often in association with thematically similar iconography, such as certain deities or immortals or other symbols of longevity, such as deer or cranes.

                                               

Soma (drink)

In Vedic tradition, soma or haoma is a ritual drink of importance among the early Indians. The Rigveda mentions it, particularly in the Soma Mandala. In the Avestan literature, the entire Yasht 20 and Yasna 9–11 treat of haoma. The texts describe the preparation of soma by means of extracting the juice from a plant, the identity of which is now unknown and debated among scholars. In both the ancient religions of Historical Vedic religion and Zoroastrianism, the name of the drink and the plant are the same. There has been much speculation about the most likely identity of the original plant ...

                                     

ⓘ Mythological food and drink

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  • strictly hierarchical, and managed by the village chief. During folk festivals Journees culturelles people are dancing around mythological masked figures like
  • The Muisca cuisine describes the food and preparation the Muisca elaborated. The Muisca were an advanced civilization inhabiting the central highlands

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